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GOP scoffs at ‚??no-negotiation‚?? vow


February 20. 2013 1:11AM
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WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama, meet Congressman Michael Burgess.


The president says he absolutely will not let Republicans threaten a national debt ceiling crisis as a way to extract deeper federal spending cuts.


Burgess' take?


It's the most preposterous thing I've ever heard, the Texas Republican says. He's going to have to negotiate.


Both sides may be bluffing, of course. They may reach an agreement before the debt-limit matter becomes a crisis in March, or possibly late February.


But the tough talk suggests this year's political fight could be even nastier and more nerve-grating than the recent fiscal cliff showdown, or the July 2011 brinkmanship that triggered the first-ever ratings downgrade of the nation's credit-worthiness.


Asked about the White House's apparent assumption that Republicans will back down, Burgess said: I'm not going to foreclose on anything, but that's just not going to happen.


He is hardly alone.


On NBC's Meet the Press Sunday, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., repeatedly declined to say he would rule out a government shutdown, prompted by a debt-ceiling impasse, in the effort to force Obama to swallow large spending cuts.


In fact, congressional Republicans of all stripes say Obama has no choice but to accept spending cuts they want in exchange for a hike in the debt ceiling, which will reach its limit in about two months. Said McConnell: We simply cannot increase the nation's borrowing limit without committing to long-overdue reforms to spending programs that are the very cause of our debt.


Obama says he's willing to discuss spending cuts in some programs. But that discussion, he says, must not be tied to GOP threats to keep the government from borrowing the money it needs to keep paying its bills, including interest on foreign-held debt.


It once was fairly routine for Congress to raise the government's borrowing limit every year or two, to keep paying bills in times of deficit spending. But the exercise became fiercely partisan in 2011.




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