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Sanford advances to GOP runoff in House race in SC


March 19. 2013 10:41PM
Associated Press



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(AP) Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford advanced Tuesday to a runoff in the Republican contest for an open congressional seat along the state's southern coast, taking a step toward reviving a political career that was derailed by an extramarital affair while he was governor.


"Are you ready to change things in Washington?" Sanford, flanked by his four sons, asked a boisterous crowd at a restaurant in Charleston's historic district. "I'm incredibly humbled by the outpouring of support we have seen tonight."


Based on unofficial results with all precincts reporting on Tuesday evening, it was unclear who Sanford would face in the April 2 GOP runoff. But the eventual Republican candidate will square off against Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch, the sister of comedian Stephen Colbert. She won the Democratic primary for the seat, handily defeating perennial candidate Ben Frasier.


Tuesday was Sanford's first run for office since a 2009 scandal in which he acknowledged an affair. After disappearing and telling his staff he was out hiking the Appalachian Trail, he returned to the state to reveal that he was in Argentina with a woman he later become engaged to after divorcing his wife, Jenny. She briefly weighed a bid for the seat but decided against it.


In addition to Sanford, 15 other candidates were vying in the GOP primary.


Former Charleston County councilman Curtis Bostic held a slim lead over state Sen. Larry Grooms for second place. The margin was so narrow, less than one percent, that a recount would automatically be required. Teddy Turner, the son of media mogul Ted Turner, trailed Bostic and Grooms.


Sanford had about 37 percent of the vote.


Mark Sanford voted Tuesday and said it was "a treat and a blessing" to be back on the ballot.


The 1st Congressional District seat became vacant last year when Republican Gov. Nikki Haley appointed then-U.S. Rep. Tim Scott to the state's empty U.S. Senate seat.


Wearing a gray windbreaker, Sanford walked alone up the street and up a flight of stairs to the building with the polling place in Charleston's historic district. He represented the district in Congress from 1994 to 2000, before he was elected governor.


"Casting your vote wasn't that hard," he laughed, but then added "it's a very significant race for me in a lot of different ways."


Sanford said after voting that life can be a series of course corrections.


"We all hope for a second chance. I believe in a God of second chances," Sanford said. "On a professional level, we have had a couple of months to talk about the issues. In that regard it has been a treat and a blessing."


Sanford, who spent months apologizing to groups around the state after he revealed his affair, said when he announced for his old congressional seat that the apology tour was over. Known for his frugality as both a congressman and governor, he has been spending the campaign talking about getting the nation's fiscal house in order.


With Sanford's campaign war chest and name recognition, Tuesday's race was largely for second place. With so many candidates, an April 2 GOP runoff was virtually assured.


Minutes before Sanford voted, state Rep. Chip Limehouse cast his ballot at the same polling place. Limehouse, who has spent almost $500,000 on the race, said he was sure Sanford would make the runoff and hoped he would be in second place.


"Purely by name ID, the governor has an advantage going into today. I'm not sure that goes past today," he said.


Turner was optimistic after voting at an armory in nearby Mount Pleasant.


"This race has been exciting all along because we started at zero," said Turner, making his first run for political office. "We have made our way as high as you can go in this race because you're not going to pass Sanford in the primary."


For Colbert Busch, the race was the fulfillment of a dream she has had since a young child.


"What an incredible opportunity. God bless America that we can do this," she said earlier Tuesday, adding that if she won, she would have two weeks to concentrate on the campaign while the Republicans in the runoff battle each other. "That is a real advantage."


Turnout was low, as expected in a special primary.


Associated Press


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