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Starbucks’ stance puts it in hot seat on guns


September 18. 2013 11:15PM
CANDICE CHOI AP Food Industry Writer

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NEW YORK — Starbucks has always set itself apart by taking strong positions on progressive political issues. Now that reputation has landed the company in the middle of the heated national debate over gun laws.


On Thursday, the Seattle-based company will run full-page ads in major newspapers, telling customers that guns are no longer welcome in its cafes. But Starbucks is stopping short of an outright ban, exposing the fine line it needs to walk on a highly divisive issue.


“We are not pro-gun or anti-gun,” CEO Howard Schultz said in an interview, noting that customers will still be served if they choose to a carry gun.


The move comes as the company has finds itself at the center of a fight it didn’t start. In recent months, gun control advocates have been pressuring Starbucks to ban firearms, while supporters of gun rights have celebrated the company’s decision to defer to local laws. About a month ago, Starbucks shut down a store in Newtown, Conn. early to avoid a demonstration by gun rights advocates. They had planned to stage a “Starbucks Appreciation Day,” bringing their firearms and turning the company into an unwitting supporter of gun rights.


Support for guns runs counter to the Starbucks image. The warm feeling Starbucks customers get when they’re sipping lattes doesn’t always come from the coffee. For some, part of the brand’s attraction is the company’s liberal-leaning support of gay marriage and environmental issues. At least some of Starbucks’ more than $13 billion in annual revenue is derived from people who agree with the company’s views.


But with some 7,000 company-owned stores across the country —in red states and blue— Starbucks is being forced to tread carefully with its special blend of politics and commerce.


Many states allow people to carry licensed guns in some way, but some businesses exercise their right to ban firearms. They can do so because their locations are considered private property. Starbucks isn’t the only company that doesn’t ban guns, but it has become a target for gun control advocates, in part because of its corporate image.


“This is a coffee company that has championed progressive issues,” said Shannon Watts, founder of the gun reform group Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. “They’ve positioned themselves about being about the human spirit — that was so at odds with this policy that allowed guns inside their stores.”


Starbucks’ mission statement is to “inspire and nurture the human spirit” and over the years, it has taken strong positions on a number of thorny issues. Earlier this year, the company banned smoking within 25 feet of its stores, wherever its leases allowed. The idea was to extend its no-smoking policy to the outdoor seating areas, regardless of state laws on the matter.




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