Last updated: September 08. 2013 8:38PM - 668 Views
Associated Press



Supporters of former presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador cheer as they listen to Lopez Obrador during an act to protest against the governments proposed energy reforms that would allow private companies to explore the country's oil and gas reserves, in Mexico City, Sunday Sept. 8, 2013. The proposed reform requires constitutional changes that strike at the heart of one of Mexico's proudest moments: President Lazaro Cardenas' nationalization of the oil company in 1938. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
Supporters of former presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador cheer as they listen to Lopez Obrador during an act to protest against the governments proposed energy reforms that would allow private companies to explore the country's oil and gas reserves, in Mexico City, Sunday Sept. 8, 2013. The proposed reform requires constitutional changes that strike at the heart of one of Mexico's proudest moments: President Lazaro Cardenas' nationalization of the oil company in 1938. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
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(AP) Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto is proposing sweeping changes to the country's social programs, with a plan to implement the country's first nationwide pensions, unemployment insurance and capital-gains taxes.


Pena Nieto's plan had originally been billed as a tax system reform, and it would cut most of the industry-specific tax loopholes written into Mexico's tax codes over decades.


But in his announcement Sunday, Pena Nieto went much further by proposing Mexico's first carbon tax and the first levy on soft drinks, which he said is needed to combat the country's high rate of obesity.


The proposals must be approved by both houses of congress and a majority of state legislatures, because they involve constitutional changes.


Associated Press
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