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Last updated: July 03. 2013 6:36PM - 469 Views
Associated Press



This photo provided by the family shows, from left, Jolene, Janet and Gabrielle Dunnabeck at their home in Whitney, Texas on Monday, July 1, 2013. The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday it is investigating a close call between a Texas-bound Spirit Airlines flight they were aboard and a skydiving plane that forced the jetliner to dive sharply over Michigan on Sunday evening. "It was horrifying," Janet Dunnabeck said. "Every person on that plane was screaming. We thought we were going down." She added the plunge caused overhead luggage bins to spill open, drinks to spill and flight attendants to bump their heads. (AP Photo)
This photo provided by the family shows, from left, Jolene, Janet and Gabrielle Dunnabeck at their home in Whitney, Texas on Monday, July 1, 2013. The Federal Aviation Administration said Monday it is investigating a close call between a Texas-bound Spirit Airlines flight they were aboard and a skydiving plane that forced the jetliner to dive sharply over Michigan on Sunday evening. "It was horrifying," Janet Dunnabeck said. "Every person on that plane was screaming. We thought we were going down." She added the plunge caused overhead luggage bins to spill open, drinks to spill and flight attendants to bump their heads. (AP Photo)
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(AP) The operator of a southeastern Michigan skydiving company says his pilot is blameless in a close encounter with a Spirit Airlines plane that forced the jetliner with 131 people aboard into a sharp evasive dive.


The Airbus 319 jetliner took off from Detroit Metropolitan Airport on Sunday evening and was bound for Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport when the encounter occurred over Tecumseh, Mich.


Franz Gerschwiler operates Skydive Tecumseh. He says the Federal Aviation Administration indicates his pilot did nothing wrong.


Gerschwiler tells The Daily Telegram of Adrian that his company is "squeaky clean" and his pilot "did everything right."


FAA spokeswoman Elizabeth Cory tells The Associated Press investigators haven't reached conclusions on the conduct of the planes' crews and air traffic controllers. She says the probe will take several weeks.


Associated Press
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