Last updated: September 05. 2013 9:36PM - 806 Views
Associated Press



In this July 12, 2013, photo, employees at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., work on the assembly of a Passat sedan. Efforts by the United Auto Worker to unionize the plant have raised concerns among southern Republicans, who worry that the move would hurt the region's ability to lure foreign automakers in the future. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig)
In this July 12, 2013, photo, employees at the Volkswagen plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., work on the assembly of a Passat sedan. Efforts by the United Auto Worker to unionize the plant have raised concerns among southern Republicans, who worry that the move would hurt the region's ability to lure foreign automakers in the future. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig)
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(AP) Volkswagen managers confirm in a letter to employees that the automaker is in talks with the United Auto Workers about establishing a German-style "works council" at its Tennessee assembly plant.


The letter is signed by the plant's chairman and CEO, Frank Fischer, and by Sebastian Patta, the facility's vice president for human resources. It was obtained Thursday by The Associated Press.


The managers acknowledge in the letter that questions about labor representation at the plant are a matter of "lively discussion."


The Germany-based company states in the letter that it's engaged in talks with the UAW because a works council can only be established in the United States through an established trade union. Some experts and Republican elected officials, such as Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker, have disputed whether that's a requirement.


Associated Press
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