Last updated: September 10. 2013 11:23PM - 582 Views

Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

Wal-Mart to take


smartphone trades


Wal-Mart Stores Inc. is launching a smartphone trade-in program later this month that will help consumers trade up to the newest phones available.


The world’s biggest retailer said Tuesday that consumers will receive a credit from $50 to $300 when they trade in their working, undamaged phone. The credit can be used toward the purchase of a new phone, with a selection of more than 100 devices to choose from. This includes some smartphones with prepaid plans.


Wal-Mart said that consumers can receive $300 credit for an Apple iPhone 5, $175 for a Samsung Galaxy SIII and $52 for a Samsung Galaxy S2.


Phones can be traded in at the electronics departments of more than 3,600 participating Walmart stores and Sam’s Club locations in the U.S. Consumers will need to enter a two-year contract for the new phone with AT&T, Verizon Wireless or Sprint.


FDA seeks stronger


pain med warning


The Food and Drug Administration is requiring stronger warning labels on prescription painkillers like OxyContin, in the government’s latest attempt to reduce overdose deaths caused by the long-acting medications.


The changes announced Tuesday are designed to remind doctors and patients about the fatal risks of misusing and abusing long-acting opioid pain relievers, which include forms of oxycodone, morphine and other narcotic medications. The new label emphasizes the drugs are only for patients with “around-the-clock” pain that cannot be treated with over-the-counter medications or immediate-release opioids.


The new label also includes a boxed warning about the risks of opioid withdrawal syndrome in infants who are exposed to the drugs during pregnancy, labor and nursing. Symptoms may include rapid breathing, trembling and poor feeding habits.


Internet puppy


sellers targeted


The Agriculture Department is cracking down on dog breeders who sell puppies over the Internet, issuing new regulations that will force them to apply for federal licenses.


The rules announced Tuesday would subject dog owners who breed more than four females and sell the puppies online, by mail or over the phone to the same oversight faced by wholesale animal breeders.


Many breeders who run their businesses online have skirted federal oversight by classifying themselves as retail pet stores, which are exempt from licensing requirements. Commercial pet stores aren’t required to have licenses because buyers can see the animals before they buy them and decide whether they appear healthy and cared for. But that’s not the case when buying over the Internet.


The idea behind the new rules, says USDA’s Kevin Shea, is that either government inspectors or buyers see the animals with their own eyes before they are sold.


Comments
comments powered by Disqus



Featured Businesses


Poll



Info Minute



Gas Prices

Wilkes-Barre Gas Prices provided by GasBuddy.com