Saturday, July 26, 2014





Mergers start strong in ‘14


March 05. 2014 11:37PM
By Ken Sweet AP Markets Writer



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NEW YORK — So far, 2014 is looking like the year of the big deal.


Flush with cash and high stock prices, American companies are buying up the competition at levels not seen since the dotcom bubble. And with Washington providing more clarity on government spending plans, CEOs are more confident their expansion hopes will pan out — especially if the economy keeps growing.


In the last month, Comcast has offered to buy Time Warner Cable for $45 billion. Pharmaceutical giant Actavis is buying Forest Laboratories for $25 billion. And Facebook shocked the technology world by offering $19 billion for tiny WhatsApp.


Merger-and-acquisition executives say they have expected a pickup in deal activity for a couple of years, given the bull market and economic recovery. But what prevented the really big transactions was uncertainty about the federal budget, the debt ceiling and the fate of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act.


With those issues resolved — at least for now — the way has opened up for bigger, more complex deals.


“The deals we have seen in the last couple of weeks are that tipping point that we’ve been waiting for,” said Mark Walsh, who heads up the M&A practice at Deloitte, one of the world’s largest accounting and consulting firms. “There’s so much pent-up demand to do a deal now.”


U.S. companies announced $336.13 billion in deals in January and February, according to Dealogic. That’s up 31 percent from $256.21 billion during the same period last year. It’s the largest amount spent during the first two months of the year since 2000.


Companies announced 1,550 deals in the first two months of 2014, according to Dealogic. While that is down from the last two years, the average transaction size is more than double what it was a year ago.


The high prices reflect companies going on the offensive to boost their earnings. The economy, while growing, still isn’t booming. Since the end of the recession, companies have had to act defensively — protecting profits by cutting costs through layoffs or benefit reductions or by moving manufacturing elsewhere.




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