Last updated: April 03. 2013 11:47PM - 883 Views

AP FILE PHOTOA worker tears off the leaves of a Vidalia onion plant before planting its roots into the soil on an onion farm in Lyons, Ga. Sweeping immigration legislation taking shape in the Senate will aim to dramatically overhaul the nation's agriculture worker program to create a steady supply of labor.
AP FILE PHOTOA worker tears off the leaves of a Vidalia onion plant before planting its roots into the soil on an onion farm in Lyons, Ga. Sweeping immigration legislation taking shape in the Senate will aim to dramatically overhaul the nation's agriculture worker program to create a steady supply of labor.
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WASHINGTON — Sweeping immigration legislation taking shape in the Senate will aim to overhaul the nation’s agriculture worker program to create a steady supply of labor for farmers and growers, who rely more than any other industry on workers who are living in the country illegally.


Farm workers already here would get a speedier path to legal status than other immigrants here illegally, and a likely new visa program would make it easier for foreign workers to come to the United States. Policymakers aim to install such workers in place of the half or more of the nation’s farm labor workforce estimated to be in the country illegally.


Negotiators have been working to finalize an agreement in time for the measure to be included in bipartisan legislation expected to be released next week, but disagreements on wages and numbers of visas are proving tough to solve.


Labor groups are accusing growers of pushing to lower farmworkers’ wages, while growers dispute that and say they want to pay a fair wage. Meanwhile, labor is resisting growers’ attempts to increase the potential numbers of new workers who would come in, as growers argue their industry’s viability depends on a strong new labor supply.


“It comes down to either we’re importing our labor or we’re importing our food, and if we don’t have access to a legal supply of labor we will start going offshore,” said Kristi Boswell, director of congressional relations for the American Farm Bureau Federation.


The issue has gotten little public attention in an immigration debate focused on securing the border, creating a path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants living in the country illegally and designing a new visa program for low-skilled workers outside of agriculture.


But for states from California to Georgia to Florida with booming agriculture industries, it’s a critical part of the puzzle.

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