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Bill to tax Internet sales advances in Senate

Reeder


April 25. 2013 11:48PM
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WASHINGTON — The Senate moved closer Thursday to passing a bill to tax purchases made over the Internet. But a final vote in the Senate was delayed until senators return from a weeklong vacation.


Although opponents hope senators will hear from angry constituents over the next week, they have a steep hill to climb to defeat the bill in the Senate.


The Senate voted 63-30 Thursday to end debate on the bill, setting up a final Senate vote to pass the bill on May 6.


The final vote will only require a majority to pass the bill, so 14 supporters would have to flip to stop it.


President Barack Obama supports the bill, but it faces an uncertain fate in the House, where some Republicans consider it a tax increase.


The bill would empower states to require online retailers to collect state and local sales taxes for purchases made over the Internet. Under the bill, the sales taxes would be sent to the states where a shopper lives.


Under current law, states can only require stores to collect sales taxes if the store has a physical presence in the state. As a result, many online sales are essentially tax-free, giving Internet retailers an advantage over brick-and-mortar stores.


Retailers who have lobbied in favor of the bill celebrated Thursday’s vote.


“The special treatment of big online businesses at the expense of retailers on Main Street will soon be a thing of the past,” said Bill Hughes of the Retail Industry Leaders Association. “The overwhelmingly bipartisan support for leveling the playing field is rare in today’s political environment and paves the way for a level playing field once and for all.”


A handful of senators from states without sales taxes opposed the bill, with Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., leading the fight against it. Oregon, Montana, New Hampshire and Delaware have no sales taxes, though the two senators from Delaware support the bill.


“It’s coercive. It requires a number of states to collect the taxes of other states thousands of miles away against their will,” Wyden said in an interview.


Wyden said the bill also gives an advantage to foreign retailers. Supporters say the bill treats foreign retailers the same as domestic ones, but opponents question the ability of states to enforce state tax laws on companies based in other countries.




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