Quantcast


Last updated: February 05. 2014 3:12PM - 1153 Views
Brittany Pierce Abington Journal Correspondent



Construction workers Wayne Martin, from Beavertown, Eric Brubaker, from Port Trevorton and Jesse Stauffer from Port Trevorton, at the work site for $1.8 million wastewater treatment facility project in Waverly Township.
Construction workers Wayne Martin, from Beavertown, Eric Brubaker, from Port Trevorton and Jesse Stauffer from Port Trevorton, at the work site for $1.8 million wastewater treatment facility project in Waverly Township.
Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

Waverly Township’s engineer, Ned Slocum, attended the Jan. 27 meeting of the township’s supervisors to give a report on the progress of the construction on the $1.8 million wastewater treatment facility behind the municipal building on Lake Henry Drive.


The project began about a year ago to upgrade, update, and increase efficiency of the facility. The purpose of the upgrade was for nutrient elimination because of the Cheaspeake Bay Initiative. Once the project is completed any amonia in the water will be eliminated through the new filters even if the temperatures drop below freezing.


The freezing temperatures have been the only reasons for project setbacks thus far, but the majority of the project is on schedule, Slocum said. The biggest setback has been that the damp-proofing laminate being applied to the concrete walls was not able to adequately dry with the low temperatures.


Slocum describes the contractors — Quandel Group of Harrisburg and Everon Electrical of Scranton — as “very cooperative, very good to work with … so far (they’re doing doing an excellent job.” Completion is expected in late April.


A prescription take-back program provided by the county will be available Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. with the nearest drop-off location for prescriptions being the South Abington Township police department on Shady Lane Road. Medication that is discarded at home is finding its way into water sources. The most efficient way to discard of old medication, according to Supervisor Douglas Klamp, who is also a doctor, is to turn it into your doctor who can dispose of medical waste properly.


In the police chief’s report, Chief Kenneth James requested permission to purchase a new patrol car due to the current one being unable to repair. A 2014 Ford SUV will be purchased for $34,500 through the COSTARS program, which is Pennsylvania’s cooperative purchasing organization for governmental entities. A motion was made by Supervisor Ron Whitaker to accept the request.


The Ford replaces the township’s 2008 Crown Victoria cruiser, which was damaged when Patrolman Eric Judge struck a deer while responding to a call on Jan. 5 in Glenburn Township, which contracts with Waverly for police coverage.


The township will use the nearly $6,000 it received from its insurance company and money from its vehicle budget to cover the costs of the purchase.


The Mount Airy Casino in Monroe County is eyed as a funding source for a road reconstruction in the township. The Lackawanna County Community Reinvest Program, which uses a portion of the local share funds generated at the casino for projects in Monroe County’s neighboring counties including Lackawanna, will soon announce grants for community projects.


Waverly Township Manager Bill White will be submitting a request to pay for the reconstruction of Stevenson Road.


Comments
comments powered by Disqus



Featured Businesses


Poll



Info Minute



Gas Prices

Wilkes-Barre Gas Prices provided by GasBuddy.com