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Last updated: January 12. 2014 11:44PM - 838 Views
MITCH WEISS and BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated Press Writers



Charleston, W.Va., residents continue to load up on bottled water Sunday after a chemical spill Thursday in the Elk River that has contaminated the public water supply in nine counties.
Charleston, W.Va., residents continue to load up on bottled water Sunday after a chemical spill Thursday in the Elk River that has contaminated the public water supply in nine counties.
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DRY BRANCH, W.Va. — For Bonnie Wireman, the white plastic bag covering her kitchen faucet is a reminder that she can’t drink the water.


The 81-year-old woman placed it there after forgetting several times the tap water was tainted after a coal processing chemical leaked into the area’s water supply. Every time she turned on the water, she’d quickly stop and clean her hands with peroxide — just to make sure she was safe.


The widow of a coal miner, Wireman is frustrated about the chemical spill that’s deprived 300,000 West Virginians of clean tap water for four days: “I’m really angry.”


But as quickly as she said it, she wanted to make one thing clear: She didn’t blame the coal or chemical industries for the spill.


“I hope this doesn’t hurt coal,” said Wireman, who lives in an area known around the state as Chemical Valley because of all the plants nearby. “We need those jobs.”


And that’s the dilemma for many West Virginians: The industries provide thousands of good paying jobs but also pose risks for the communities surrounding them, such as the chemical spill or coal mine disasters. The current emergency began Thursday after a foaming agent used in coal processing escaped from a Freedom Industries plant in Charleston and seeped into the Elk River. Since then, residents have been ordered not to use tap water for anything but flushing toilets.


Chemical plant storage tanks rise from the valley floor. Coal mines — with heavy equipment and steel structures used to extract and then transport the fuel — are part of the rural landscape.


“You won’t find many people in these parts who are against these industries. But we have to do a better job of regulating them,” said Wireman’s son, Danny Scott, 59, a retired General Electric worker. “The state has a lot to offer. We don’t want to destroy it.”


West Virginia is the second-largest coal producing state behind Wyoming, with 538 mines and 26,619 people. The state has about 150 chemical companies that employ 12,000 workers.


In January 2010, a worker died at a DuPont plant after inhaling a lethal dose of phosgene, which is used in the making of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds. An explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine killed 29 people in 2010.


Coal is critical to West Virginia’s economy. Strong coal prices and demand proved vital to the state budget during and after the national recession, from 2009 through 2011.


In November 2009, the state’s unemployment rate was 8.4 percent, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Four years later — November 2013 — the unemployment rate was down to 6.1 percent, below the national rate of 7 percent.


The spill that tainted the water supply involved a chemical used in coal processing. But it didn’t involve a coal mine — and that’s a point state officials are trying to convey to the public.


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