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Money for Philly schools may ease way to transportation funding


October 16. 2013 11:21PM
The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

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HARRISBURG — Republican Gov. Tom Corbett’s release of $45 million to the cash-strapped Philadelphia school district may represent a step toward an eventual deal on transportation revenue, said staff members for legislative leaders.


Corbett’s spokesman, Jay Pagni, flatly denied a connection. “It is not” tied to transportation, Pagni said.


Corbett released the money, removing “what would certainly have been an obstacle, but it does not trigger a deal on transportation,” said House Democratic Caucus spokesman Bill Patton. A Republican staffer confirmed that helping Philadelphia schools may make a transportation deal more likely.


Still, Pagni said, “This has nothing to do with politics; it has everything to do with the Philadelpia school district.”


Corbett withheld the money since lawmakers approved the state budget in June, saying he needed evidence of substantial reform in Philadelphia. A letter from Superintendent William Hite convinced the governor that district officials are making operational and managerial changes, Pagni said.


“I’m not aware of a deal on (transportation),” Senate Minority Leader Jay Costa, D-Forest Hills, said Wednesday.


Senate Transportation Chairman John Rafferty, R-Chester County, said he hopes resolution of the school funding issue improves the climate for a transportation funding bill. But he said, “I’ve had no discussion with anyone about it” except Transportation Secretary Barry Schoch.


Rafferty is sponsor of a Senate funding bill to provide $2.5 billion in new revenue to fix roads and bridges and maintain mass transit.


Getting the Legislature to approve money for transportation needs has proven to be elusive for Corbett. Lawmakers recessed for two-and-a half months in June without approving a transportation bill.


Most of the money in the Senate bill would come from lifting the cap on the state’s wholesale tax on gasoline, which opponents call a tax hike and supporters say is a user fee.


Lawmakers said in June that they perceived a tie between a transportation bill and legislation to privatize the state stores. The state House approved a plan to phase out the state-owned liquor stores but balked at passing transportation funding. The Senate approved Rafferty’s transportation bill but many senators of both parties said they were reluctant to sell the state stores.


The General Assembly returned to session in September. A vote on transportation in the House is pending as supporters try to round up votes. Liquor divestiture has moved to the background.




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