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In post-election vacuum, Rubio on rise within GOP


March 16. 2013 8:12PM
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(AP) Marco Rubio is taking center stage as Republicans search for a new leader.


In the nearly 100 days since President Barack Obama won a second term, the Florida senator has made calculated, concrete steps to emerge as a next-generation leader of a rudderless party, put a 21st-century stamp on the conservative movement and potentially position himself for a future presidential run.


The bilingual Cuban-American lawmaker has become Republicans' point person on immigration reform and pitches economic solutions at middle-class workers. He is an evangelist for a modern, inclusive party that welcomes more Hispanics and minorities but says Republicans must stay true to their principles.


In a way, he's trying to save us from ourselves, says Al Cardenas, the chairman of the American Conservative Union who gave Rubio his first job in politics as a South Florida field staffer during Bob Dole's 1996 presidential campaign. He gives us comfort against the naysayers who say we need to change our basic beliefs to attract a wider audience.


Rubio will give the Republican response to Obama's State of the Union address Tuesday, a rebuttal that Rubio advisers say will offer economic prescriptions for a sluggish economy and counter what they call Obama's government-centered economic approach.


The speech comes as demand for the 41-year-old son of immigrants has soared and the party has tried to recover from significant electoral losses and map out a path ahead.


Call it the it factor. Time magazine splashed Rubio on its cover this week, anointing him The Republican Savior. Rubio, a Catholic, responded on Twitter: There is only one savior, and it is not me. (hash)Jesus. He shrugged off the label during an interview with The Associated Press: I didn't write the cover. I wouldn't have said it if I wrote it.


There are no saviors in politics, he said.


The former Florida House speaker has been on a Republican rocket ship since 2010, when he knocked off Florida Gov. Charlie Crist in a Senate race that showed the tea party's clout. He introduced presidential nominee Mitt Romney at the Republican National Convention.


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Associated Press writer Christine Armario contributed to this report from Miami.


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Follow Ken Thomas at: http://twitter.com/AP_Ken_Thomas


Associated Press


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