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Irish defense fails to stem the Tide


February 20. 2013 1:12AM
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MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. — Manti Te'o stood perfectly still as he took a long look at one of the giant video screens in Sun Life Stadium, studying the replay of an Alabama touchdown.


It was a pose that Notre Dame repeated way, way too often in Monday's BCS title game.


Te'o — widely considered the nation's top defensive player this season — was a non-factor early in the national championship game, and that foreshadowed how the rest of the night went for the Fighting Irish. Overmatched from the opening possession, Notre Dame allowed season highs in points and yardage, simply unable to stop the Crimson Tide.


Final score: Alabama 42, Notre Dame 14.


And yes, it was that one-sided of a game, one that even had Irish coach Brian Kelly cracking a joke at his own expense in a televised halftime interview.


All Alabama, Kelly said at the time. I mean, we can't tackle them right now. And who knows why? They're big and physical — I guess I do know why.


Anyone who was watching knew why.


The lowlights were stacked high by the time this game was over. Te'o missed a couple of tackles early, something he hardly ever did this season. By halftime, when it was 28-0, the Irish had already given up more points than they had in any game this season, the previous high being 26 in a triple-overtime win over Pittsburgh. The most yards Notre Dame gave up this season was 379; Alabama cracked the 500 mark early in the fourth quarter.


Maybe the play that will be most replayed of all was the one where Eddie Lacy essentially tackled Danny Spond.


The significance?


Well, Lacy was the Alabama ballcarrier at the time, holding the football with one arm and sending Spond — one of Notre Dame's top linebackers — sprawling with the other as he rumbled past for an extra yard or two.


Bigger, stronger, faster. By night's end, it couldn't be argued that the Crimson Tide held all those titles.


It's why Alabama will fly home Tuesday with its third national title trophy from the last four seasons, no longer a budding dynasty — but an established one.


Notre Dame arrived at the title game on the cusp of what would have been a fantasy scenario, that of being unranked at the start of the season and the undisputed champions at the end of the campaign.


After one play, it looked as if it might happen when Lacy was stopped after a 1-yard gain, wrapped up just over the line of scrimmage.


One play later, Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron connected with Kevin Norwood for 29 yards, placing a pass between two Notre Dame defenders.


Such was the theme the rest of the night. Even when Notre Dame had its moments, they didn't last long. Lacy ran in from 20 yards to cap that first Alabama drive, the Tide stretched the lead to 21-0 after one play of the second quarter, and the outcome was never in doubt.


Some of the lower-bowl seats at Sun Life were being resold for as much as $10,000 in the days before the game. The majority of those seats were empty long before the finish, those fans for whatever reason deciding they didn't need to see yet another Alabama coronation.



BIGGEST CROWD: The BCS title game was the most highly attended event in the history of Sun Life Stadium.


The announced attendance for Alabama-Notre Dame was 80,120 — a bit higher than the previous mark of 78,468, set four years ago when Florida and Oklahoma played there for the national championship.


Those 80,120 tickets will result in $80,120 being donated toward a fund for the victims of last month's school massacre in Newtown, Conn.



MEDIA BLITZ: About 875 media credentials were issued for the BCS title game, and that doesn't even include those requested by ESPN for its television purposes.


In all, about 1,225 applications were received, according to the Orange Bowl Committee.


Both numbers are slightly ahead of the pace for last season's Alabama-LSU game.



NO STAGE FRIGHT: Barrett Jones remembers his first BCS title game, and how he was petrified of what would happen on college football's biggest stage.


Hey, it's old hat now for the Alabama center -- this was his third time in the title game in four years.


I tell you what, the first national championship game I played in in 2009, I was freaking out in my hotel room, Jones said. You let the moment get to you and you think, ‘50 million people are going to be watching this game on TV?' It's a surreal feeling.


Now, no big deal.


You just have to remember, despite all the lights and all the cameras and all you guys, it's still football, Jones said.




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