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Suicides in military surge as wars ease


February 20. 2013 2:09AM
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WASHINGTON — Suicides in the U.S. military surged to a record 349 last year, far exceeding American combat deaths in Afghanistan, and some private experts are predicting the dark trend will grow worse this year.


The Pentagon has struggled to deal with the suicides, which Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and others have called an epidemic. The problem reflects severe strains on military personnel burdened with more than a decade of combat in Afghanistan and Iraq, complicated by anxiety over the prospect of being forced out of a shrinking force.


Pentagon figures obtained Monday by The Associated Press show that the 349 suicides among active-duty troops last year were up from 301 the year before and exceeded the Pentagon's own internal projection of 325. Statistics alone do not explain why troops take their own lives, and the Pentagon's military and civilian leaders have acknowledged more needs to be done to understand the causes.


Last year's total is the highest since the Pentagon began closely tracking suicides in 2001. It exceeds the 295 Americans who died in Afghanistan last year, by the AP's count.


Some in Congress are pressing the Pentagon to do more.


This is an epidemic that cannot be ignored, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., said Monday.


Military suicides began rising in 2006 and soared to a then-record 310 in 2009 before leveling off for two years. It surprised many that the numbers resumed an upward climb this year, given that U.S. military involvement in Iraq is over and the Obama administration is winding down the war in Afghanistan.


Now that we're decreasing our troops and they're coming back home, that's when they're really in the danger zone, when they're transitioning back to their families, back to their communities and really finding a sense of purpose for themselves, said Kim Ruocco, whose husband, Marine Maj. John Ruocco, killed himself between Iraq deployments in 2005. She directs a suicide-prevention program, Tragedy Assistance Programs, or TAPS.


The Army had the highest number of suicides among active-duty troops last year at 182, but the Marine Corps had the largest percentage increase: a 50 percent jump to 48. The Air Force had 59 suicides, up 16 percent from the previous year, and the Navy had 60, up 15 percent.


All the numbers are tentative, pending the completion of formal pathology reports.




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