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Last updated: February 16. 2013 5:27PM - 198 Views

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PHILADELPHIA — A plaintiff in a lawsuit seeking to overturn Pennsylvania's tough new voter identification law has received the state-issued photo ID card necessary to vote, despite saying she'd been rejected for years because she lacked appropriate documentation to receive the card.


Viviette Applewhite, who recalled marching for voting rights in 1960 with Martin Luther King Jr., was issued the temporary card on Thursday, the same day lawyers for her and others opposing the law appealed a judge's refusal to halt the law from taking effect in the Nov. 6 presidential election.


Applewhite, 93, had trouble meeting the state's documentation requirements to get a photo ID. For one thing, she did not have a Social Security card after it was stolen with her purse some years ago, she has said. Plus, she was adopted early in life, making the name on her birth certificate different from that on her other paperwork, and she did not have a record of the adoption.


PennDOT's licensing bureau director Janet Dolan said Friday that clerks are able to make exceptions to the document requirements and work with applicants.


"You just have to keep trying," Applewhite said. "Don't give up."


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